Cultural Environment

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Frederik VII's Channel

Because of the shallow grounds of Løgstør it was difficult to moor at Løgstør, and ships from the western Limfjord might have to wait for weeks at Løgstør to be able to be transported on barges. Even fewer ships docked after the North Sea in 1825 broke through Agger Tange at Thyborøn, so they could now sail into the fiord from the North Sea side. It was therefore decided to dig Frederik VII's Canal. The canal is 4.4 km long, approximately 25 meters wide and 3 meters deep. Several hundred ships passed each year the channel and at the end of 1800 had risen to almost 3,000 vessels per. years. After creating a shipping channel through Løgstør Land, closed it in 1913 canal for shipping but decided to preserve the cultural and historical reasons. The channel was listed in 1958.

Canal Bailiff House

The Canal Bailiff's house - now home of the museum - was built in 1863 immediately after the construction of Kong Frederik VII's Canal in 1856-1861. Here the Canal Bailiff lived with his family. The house towards the fjord was originally stables for the horses that pulled the ships down the canal. After the canal's closure in 1913, the buildings were used for residential purposes for watersupply employees until 1964-69, when Limfjordsmuseet took over. With the unique environment is the bridge, which is Denmark's oldest operating swing bridge. It was inaugurated alongside the canal and after several restorations fully functional. It can be turned by a single man.

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Skoletjeneste

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På Limfjordsmuseet tilbyder vi spændende og faglig formidling til børn og unge i daginstitutioner, skoler og på ungdomsuddannelser. Læs mere her

The Pilot Boat Ready for Launching

After an extensive restoration in four years, Løgstør's old pilot boat from 1929 is once again ready to sail the Limfjord.

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